Articles tagged with: Homelessness and Housing

Housing Associations in Ireland: Present and Future

on Wednesday, 30 July 2003. Posted in Issue 32 The 'Dependency Culture': A Good or a Bad Thing?, 1998

Introduction

Housing is once again top of the political agenda. No political party in a country with 80% home ownership can afford to ignore the difficulties currently experienced by those wishing to buy a house. However, the current situation is indicative of greater changes within the housing sector.

Traditionally one either owned one\'s house or one rented from the local authority or from a private landlord. Now many households part-buy part-rent under shared ownership schemes and there has been a large increase in rented accommodation. While many new options have become available, the current high prices of housing, both for rent and purchase, has resulted in more people being unable to fund their own accommodation.

Dying on the Streets

on Saturday, 05 July 2003. Posted in Issue 38 Dying on the Streets, 2000

Bill Toner, SJ

November 2000

Introduction

During the summer two young men from overseas, both English-speaking and white, were taking part in a Catholic ‘renewal programme’ in Dublin.   Part of the programme provided opportunities for getting in touch with the reality of poverty.   The two men chose the option of staying in a hostel for the homeless overnight.

Twenty-Five Years of Homelessness

on Thursday, 31 July 2003. Posted in Issue 35 The Claims Industry and the Public Interest, 1999

Peter McVerry

June 1999

Then and Now

In 1974, I went to live and work in Summerhill, in Dublin\'s Inner City. In those days there was no such category as \'homeless children\'. There were a few children who frequently did not return home at night or who returned home only in the early hours of the morning, but they were so few in number that they did not constitute a separate problem category.


A Green Light for a New Agenda on Housing and Planning

on Thursday, 24 June 2004. Posted in Issue 48 The Constitution: Private Property and the Common Good, 2004

Jerome Connolly

June 2004

Introduction

One of the most ideologically and economically sensitive elements in any state is the legal and constitutional regime governing the ownership of private property. The regulation, taxation and expropriation of property raise fundamental questions of justice, equity, the right to shelter, the balance between individual rights and the common good. All these matters are addressed in the Report on Private Property of the All-Party Oireachtas Committee on the Constitution, published in April 2004 (1)

Housing : A Growing Trend towards Inequality

on Thursday, 24 June 2004. Posted in Issue 48 The Constitution: Private Property and the Common Good, 2004

Margaret Burns

June 2004

Introduction

The recommendations of the All-Party Oireachtas Committee on the Constitution on the right to private property and its relationship with the requirements of the greater social good, take on particular significance when seen in the context of Ireland\'s recent unprecedented demand for housing and infrastructural development, arising from nearly a decade of high levels of economic growth.

Private Property and the Constitution

on Thursday, 24 June 2004. Posted in Issue 48 The Constitution: Private Property and the Common Good, 2004

Seamus Murphy, SJ

June 2004

In April 2004, the All-Party Oireachtas Committee on the Constitution published its Ninth Progress Report.(1) The Report discusses whether the provisions of the Irish Constitution concerning property rights obstruct social justice and the common good in the area of land and housing, with regard to purchase, planning and infrastructural development.

The Commission on the Private Rented Sector- A Reaction

on Saturday, 05 July 2003. Posted in Issue 38 Dying on the Streets, 2000

Seamus Murphy, SJ

November 2000

Table 2. COMPARATIVE PERCENTAGES (1991)

Country Owner-Occupied Private Rented Social Housing Other
Germany 38 36 26 0
Netherlands 47 17 36 6
Sweden 43 16 22 19 [co-op]
IRELAND (1995) 72 15 11 2

 

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In February 2016, the Jesuit Secretariat for Social Justice and Ecology and for Higher Education in Rome published a Special Report on Justice in the Global Economy. The Report was compiled by an international group of Jesuits and lay colleagues in the fields of social science and economics, philosophy and theology. This issue of Working Notes is a response to the Report. Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society in the areas of . It has been produced three times a year since 1987, and all of the articles are available in full on this site. Read More..