Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Working Notes Issue 65 Editorial

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Working Notes Issue 65 Editorial

Who are the ‘vulnerable’ in Ireland today? There has been a lot of talk about ‘protecting the vulnerable’ in the lead up to the recent Budget. So many vested interests, politicians, trade unions and others now appropriate the word it begins to lose its sense of meaning. Yet within our society there are clearly people who are vulnerable, whose needs are not represented, whose concerns are urgent and whose voices are not heard.

Living in Direct Provision: Resident Voices

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Elizabeth O'Rourke

December 2010

Living in Direct Provision: Resident Voices

Asylum seeking women receiving English language certificates - © JRS IrelandIntroduction
2010 marks the tenth anniversary of the introduction of the policies of Direct Provision and Dispersal.

Direct provision is a scheme for individuals and families seeking asylum or other forms of protection, which provides accommodation on a full board basis and aims to directly provide all basic daily needs of asylum applicants. Dispersal is a policy whereby asylum applicants, after an initial short stay in Dublin to process their asylum application, are sent to one of 51 state provided accommodation centres located throughout 19 counties. While awaiting a decision on their asylum claim applicants are not eligible for child benefit, do not have a right to work and have limited education rights.

The World Mobilised: The Jesuit Response to Refugees*

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Mark Raper SJ

December 2010

The World Mobilised: The Jesuit Response to Refugees

Refugee camp, Ogujebe, Uganda - © JRS International*This article is adapted from the first Annual Pedro Arrupe SJ Lecture hosted jointly by Jesuit Refugee Service and ISIRC (Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies of Religions and Cultures, Pontifical Gregorian University).

Introduction
Three core insights came together for Fr Pedro Arrupe SJ when he launched Jesuit Refugee Service 30 years ago this week. The first compelling factor was his compassion for the refugees in their suffering. He wrote to the Society on 14 November 1980 ‘…last year, struck and shocked by the plight of thousands of boat people and refugees, I felt it my duty…,’. For Arrupe the refugees were ‘signs of the times’, a feature of his historic time that compelled a compassionate response. Second, having been Superior General already for 18 years, he had a strategic sense of how the Society worked and what it was capable of: its mission, structure and strengths. Third, Pedro Arrupe had confidence in the goodwill and resourcefulness of the many partners willing to share in the same mission – ‘the active collaboration of many lay people who work with us’.

Bridging the Protection Gap: Immigration Detention and Forced Migrant Destitution

on Thursday, 09 June 2011. Posted in Issue 65 JRS: 30 Years of Serving Refugees

Philip Amaral

December 2010

Bridging the Protection Gap: Immigration Detention and Forced Migrant Destitution

Destitute Migrant in European capital - © JRS EuropeIntroduction
Asylum and migration has been at the forefront of European Union policymaking for many years, but especially so during the last decade. The gradual enlargement of the Union and the disappearance of internal borders has obliged national governments and EU institutions to fundamentally re-think how refugees and migrants are welcomed into European society. Indeed, these factors have led to a legal restructuring with EU-wide implications.

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