2002

The Contradiction of Justice

on Thursday, 10 April 2003. Posted in Issue 44 Ireland: Facing up to a Multicultural Future?, 2002

Brian Lennon, SJ

Justice is about right relationships

Justice is about right relationships, respect for others, above all about the protection of the weakest in society. Child abuse is about as basic a contradiction of justice as there is. All child abuse is awful but it has been a particular shock for Catholics to realise that some priests whom they trusted and respected have been involved in it. However, the most difficult aspect to comprehend of the Church’s response to Clerical Child Abuse was the policy of moving offenders to another location where they had the possibility to re-offend. This policy was tantamount to putting the ‘good name’ of the Catholic Church above the safety of children..

A Vision for Ireland: A Question Of Tax?

Written by Eugene Quinn on Monday, 23 June 2003. Posted in Issue 43 Juvenile Crime: Are Harsher Sentences the Solution?, 2002

June 2002

Eugene Quinn , an actuary working part-time with the CFJ, examines issues of fairness in taxation.

Introduction

Taxation is always a vexing question and in the modern Ireland particularly so. The role of taxation policy in stimulating the Celtic Tiger is disputed. The neoliberal view is that the creation of a low tax environment was integral to our economic success and is an essential ingredient if that success is to continue. This premise has not gone unchallenged. The opposing view points to factors that were funded through tax revenues such as the supply of an educated labour force and the presence of an adequate infrastructure as major contributors to our economic growth in the period. These differing perspectives bring into focus tensions at the core of taxation policy.

Falling between two pillars: The prospect for pensioners in Ireland?

Written by Eugene Quinn on Friday, 04 July 2003. Posted in Issue 42 Pensions Time Bomb? Equity and Justice in the Pensions Regime, 2002

 

Eugene Quinn, an actuary working part-time with the CFJ, examines issues of equity and justice in the pensions regime.
1.      Introduction
Pensions are important to everybody. There is widespread public myopia with regard to the importance of pensions, as the consequences of neglect are so distant. For the vast majority of the population however pensions will be the chief determinant of their income in their old age. Our choices now, both as individuals and as a society, will affect how we will live as we get older. Will we have enough to live with security and dignity in a society with higher expectations of life? Will there be large income inequalities between the rich and poor of our elderly?

Politics, Corruption & Europe

on Tuesday, 18 February 2003. Posted in Issue 44 Ireland: Facing up to a Multicultural Future?, 2002

Edmund Grace. SJ

An Away Match

When the supporters of the Irish soccer team visited Estonia in early June 2001, the Nice Treaty was not on their agenda. Yet one effect of this particular away match on Dermot, a Dublin northsider, was to convince him to vote ‘yes’ in the first Nice referendum a few days later. Seeing for himself the standard of living among people in that part of the world, and knowing how well Ireland has done in recent years as a member of the European Union, he felt it was only right that the Lithuanians should be admitted as soon as possible.

Does Your Vote Matter

on Sunday, 29 June 2003. Posted in Issue 42 Pensions Time Bomb? Equity and Justice in the Pensions Regime, 2002

Seamus O'Gorman, SJ

April, 2002

1. Election day - 2002

It\'s a bright sunny day in May 2002. At last, after five long years it\'s polling day again. You grab a moment and run around to your polling station. You\'re in the little booth, attached pencil in hand. There\'s a long list of names in front of you: some you recognise, others not really. You take a deep breath. You begin to tick off the boxes… 1… 2… 3… from best to worst or maybe 14, 13, 12 from worst to best, depending on the kind of person you are.

Many others will not grab a moment to vote. They will stay away, largely ignoring what is going on on polling day. The whole election event will leave them "underwhelmed"; they may be slightly bemused to realise that some people still think voting is such an important thing. They will wonder at the naiveté or inexplicable zeal that would mean you could tear yourself away from the alternative goods life offers - an evening\'s rest, the football match, the soap, the pints - so as to mark a few numbers on a card.

Social Justice And Christian Faith

on Saturday, 05 July 2003. Posted in Issue 42 Pensions Time Bomb? Equity and Justice in the Pensions Regime, 2002

Seamus Murphy SJ, lecturer in philosophy in the Milltown Institute , explores the christian understanding of social justice.

Contemporary Irish society reflects a growing diversity of cultures and values.  In particular, Christian values and perspectives are no longer the predominant moral culture.  In the more pluralistic society that is emerging, the Christian contribution has to be made with due respect for the contributions of other groups.  This is indispensable for arriving at a degree of consensus on some notion of our shared good.

At the same time, it is accepted that not merely pluralism but also genuine equality requires valuing our diversity.  This raises the question for each group of what that group’s distinctive contribution is or ought to be.  For Christians, this includes the issue of what distinctive insights the Christian tradition could contribute to a shared understanding of social justice.[i]

Integration: What's Done? A Lot More to Do

Written by Eugene Quinn on Tuesday, 01 April 2003. Posted in Issue 44 Ireland: Facing up to a Multicultural Future?, 2002

Ireland: A transition to multi-ethnic society

 

In the last ten years Ireland has experienced dramatic changes that have transformed the political, economic and cultural landscape. The Celtic Tiger years have brought hitherto unknown wealth and prosperity. They also turned the tide of emigration. Ireland for the first period in its history experienced substantial immigration. This was not simply a flow of returning emigrants. Between 1996 and 2001 around 80,000 migrant workers were issued with visas and permits to service the labour demands of a booming economy. There was a dramatic rise in the number of asylum seekers from a mere 39 applications in 1992 to in excess of 10,000 in 2001.

A Rising Tide - but no boats to lift

Written by Peter McVerry SJ on Thursday, 10 April 2003. Posted in Issue 44 Ireland: Facing up to a Multicultural Future?, 2002

Homelessness revisited

 

Much has been written over the years about the problem of homelessness.  The causes of homelessness have been analysed and solutions proposed.   Working Notes has included articles on the issue of homelessness in the recent past.  In this article, I do not wish to repeat what has already been written but to look at the effects of the last five years of economic prosperity on the numbers of homeless people and on their prospects of escaping from homelessness in the future.

Juvenile Crime Re-visited

Written by Peter McVerry SJ on Sunday, 22 June 2003. Posted in Issue 43 Juvenile Crime: Are Harsher Sentences the Solution?, 2002

Reflection and Analysis on Social and Economic Issues
Issue 43 June 2002

Peter McVerry SJ has worked with homelesss young people for the last 25 years. In this article, he looks again at the problem of juvenile crime.
The problem explodes


A Blight on Many Communities
The recent death of two gardai in a so-called "joyriding" incident focused political and media attention once again on the problem of juvenile crime - for about five days!

The Leaving Cert. and Good Outcomes: Hard Work, Good Luck or What?

Written by Cathy Molloy on Sunday, 29 June 2003. Posted in Issue 43 Juvenile Crime: Are Harsher Sentences the Solution?, 2002

Cathy Molloy, a part-time worker at CFJ, considers some issues behind the annual Leaving Cert. hype.

 

Every year at this time the newspapers and media in general invite us to share in the immediate drama of the Leaving Cert. Even if you have no student in your house, or have not been in contact with school books for decades, you cannot be unaware of the annual wave of hysteria that seems to have to accompany the final public examinations of the nation\'s school leavers.

Issues Before 1997

Click here for a selection of articles from before 1997