Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

‘Frontloading’: The Case for Legal Resources at the Early Stages of the Asylum Process

on Wednesday, 18 November 2009. Posted in Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

Elizabeth O’Rourke

November, 2009

pdf icon‘Frontloading’: The Case for Legal Resources at the Early Stages of the Asylum Process 

Introduction

In 1992, fewer than fifty people came to Ireland seeking asylum. From 1995, however, there was a rapid increase in the numbers applying for asylum, reaching a peak of 11,634 in 2002. Following the Citizenship Referendum of 2004 and subsequent legislative changes, and consistent with underlying trends internationally, the number of asylum applications fell significantly. By 2008, applications had declined to a total of 3,866 for the year, representing a 2.9 per cent decrease on the total of 3,985 in 2007, and a 200 per cent reduction on the 2002 figure.1

Pro Bono: Still Relevant for Access to Justice

on Wednesday, 18 November 2009. Posted in Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

Patrick Hume SJ

November, 2009

Pro Bono: Still Relevant for Access to Justice

Introduction

A call to justice for the poor and marginalised is to be found in the three major monotheistic faith traditions. The Hebrew tradition specifically mentions the need for justice for the poor in their lawsuits.1 In Christian scriptures, scribes or lawyers were encouraged to foster justice, especially among the poor and widows. A similar call to justice can be found in the Quran,2 alongside calls to charity.3 Each tradition is intimately linked to law, and emphasises the need for its careful application with justice and mercy.4

The Challenges Facing the Church in Ireland in the Aftermath of the Ryan Report

on Wednesday, 18 November 2009. Posted in Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

Aileen Walsh

November,2009

pdf iconThe Challenges Facing the Church in Ireland in the Aftermath of the Ryan Report 

Introduction

The mission of the Church in every age and context is to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ. The Church always needs to be prepared to read ‘the signs of the times’ and to enquire how it can renew itself to be faithful to that mission. The Ryan Report published in May 2009, the Ferns Report published in 2005, and undoubtedly the issues which will emerge from the report into sexual abuse in the Archdiocese of Dublin, raise very serious challenges for the whole People of God in Ireland now and in the immediate future.

‘Up Stairs, Down Stairs’: Whose Interests are being Protected?

on Wednesday, 18 November 2009. Posted in Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

Peter McVerry SJ

November, 2009

‘Up Stairs, Down Stairs’: Whose Interests are being Protected?

The Parable

John and Jane are tenants in the same house. John lives in a flat on the top floor. At 8 o’clock in the morning he pulls the curtains; the sun shines in. He looks out the window at the mountains in the distance rolling down to the sea. The mountains are beautiful; sometimes in winter they are covered in snow; mostly, though, they are a luscious mixture of greens and browns. He sees the ships coming in and out of the harbour and the yachts on the sea. The sun shows the scene in all its beauty. He says: ‘It is a beautiful day. It is great to be alive’.

Jane lives in the basement flat of the same house. At 8 o’clock in the morning she pulls the curtains; nothing happens. The sun cannot get in. She looks out the window but she cannot see the mountains, or the sea or the yachts or the sun. All she sees is a stone wall, yards from the window. She hardly knows what sort of day it is.

Working Notes Issue 62 Editorial

on Wednesday, 18 November 2009. Posted in Issue 62 Who Will Pay for Recession?

Issue 62 Editorial

In a recent interview, the writer Iain Banks, expressing strong criticism of senior British politicians, said that they were ‘very good at standing up to the weak and poor, and utterly pathetic at standing up against the rich and powerful; they roll over every single time’ (The Guardian, 8 September 2009). As we in Ireland watch measures being unfolded to deal with the banking crisis and the deficit in the public finances, we too may have cause to wonder if our decision-makers, and those who influence them, favour an approach of being ‘strong with the weak’ and ‘weak with the strong’.

When Ireland became an independent State it inherited some appallingly bad housing conditions. This was most notoriously the case in the severely deprived areas of inner-city Dublin, but inadequate and overcrowded housing which lacked basic facilities was also prevalent in towns and villages and rural areas around the country. Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society. It has been produced since 1987.