2007

Development

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May, 2007

 

pdf Development 54.84 Kb


Introduction

The Government’s performance in recent years in relation to development cooperation has been hailed in many quarters as a considerable success. The decision in 2005 to re-instate the commitment to meeting the UN target of spending 0.7 per cent of GNP on development aid, and the achievement of the first interim target of 0.5 per cent by 2007, have been widely welcomed. Ireland continues to provide a high quality of aid, having good aid predictability, not tying its aid to conditions and being poverty focused. Given its relatively small population, Ireland is a not a big donor in terms of overall volume of aid but its per capita contribution is high and is set to improve further. The most recent OECD survey places Ireland sixth in the global league table of countries’ contributions to development aid as a percentage of Gross National Income.

Alcohol and Drugs

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May, 2007

 

pdf Alcohol and Drugs 79.70 Kb


One of the notable features of prosperous Ireland has been its level of spending on alcohol and illegal drugs. The Strategic Task Force on Alcohol report of 2004 calculated that the country’s annual expenditure on alcohol of nearly €6 billion of personal income in 2002 represented €1,942 for every person over fifteen years of age.1

Climate Change

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May, 2007

pdf Climate change 65.57 Kb


Introduction

If the Dáil we elect at the forthcoming General Election lasts a full term, it will oversee the whole five-year period of Ireland’s commitment under the Kyoto Protocol (2008–2012). It will also cover the period during which the international negotiations to agree new and more challenging commitments to reduce our climate-changing pollution will be conducted.

Crime and Prisons

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May, 2007

 

pdf Crime and Prisons 60.65 Kb


Tough on Crime or Tough on Criminals?

While it may be difficult to predict the outcome of the forthcoming General Election, it is somewhat easier to make accurate predictions about the issues that will surface as the election campaign unfolds. Crime will almost certainly feature prominently and we can safely expect that the political parties will compete with one another to prove to the voters that it is they who will be the toughest on crime.

Migration

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Migration 61.83 Kb


Introduction
In its report, Migration in an Interconnected World, the Global Commission on International Migration noted:

Educational Disadvantage

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Education Disadvantage 65.09 Kb


Introduction

If you are a child or young person attending school in a disadvantaged area of Dublin, there is a 30 per cent chance that you will leave primary school with a serious literacy problem;1 only a 50:50 chance that you will sit your Leaving Certificate,2 and a 90 per cent probability that you will not go to college.3 In contrast, if you are a child or young person whose parents are from a professional background and you live in a prosperous part of Dublin, you have only a 10 per cent chance of leaving primary school with a serious literacy problem, you will almost certainly complete your Leaving Certificate and be part of the 86 per cent of young people in your area who go to college.

Health

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Health 59.88 Kb


The Health of the Nation
Everyone agrees that ‘health’ will be one of the major issues in the coming General Election. In reality, however, it is not health but health services that will be the focus of debate. But the state of the nation’s health ought to merit some serious attention, and some promises of action, by those who would aspire to form the next government.

Housing and Homelessness

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Housing and Homelessness 61.12 Kb


Introduction
If, as predicted, the number of new houses built during 2007 shows a decline on the 2006 figure, this will represent a notable break with the significant upward trend in housing construction that has been such a feature of the past decade. Whereas 26,500 houses and apartments were built in 1995, the number rose to 49,812 in 2000 and to 93,419 in 2006. In other words, housing output in 2006 was more than 250 per cent higher than in 1995.

Poverty and Inequality

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Poverty and Inequality 164.03 Kb

 


Introduction

Ireland has seen a dramatic economic boom over the past decade, with unprecedented levels of growth in employment and living standards. Unemployment has fallen very sharply and substantial numbers of migrants have been attracted to Ireland to work. Despite this, the numbers ‘at risk of poverty’ have grown – the ‘risk of poverty’ being a key measure of poverty among the EU’s indicators of social inclusion.1 There has also been considerable concern expressed about rising inequality and about core features of the strategy adopted by the Government to combat poverty.

Voting in Pursuit of Justice

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Voting in Pursuit of Justice 26/04/2007,17:30 54.85 Kb

 

The Forthcoming Election
The imminence of the third General Election since the Irish economic boom began provides an opportunity to consider how far we as a people, residents of one of the wealthiest countries in the world, are concerned with eliminating poverty and injustice.

Integration: A Challenge in Principle, in Policy and in Practice

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007

February 2007

Eugene Quinn is National Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service (Ireland)
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Introduction
The economic boom of the Celtic Tiger years has transformed Ireland from a country of origin into a country of destination. Sustained and stellar economic growth from the early 1990s not only persuaded thousands of Irish nationals to return but attracted non Irish national migrant workers in large numbers. They were responding to the recruitment efforts of Irish employers who, faced with the significant skill and labour shortages that were a consequence of the boom, began to look overseas to fill vacancies.

Trafficking and the Irish Sex Industry

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007


Cathy Molloy is a Research Officer with the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice
February, 2007

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‘These stories are horrific. They made us really angry that this could be happening in our country.’ ‘We are not going to stop until the legislation is changed.’ (The Carlow Nationalist, 19 May 2005 quoting Catriona Kelly a then Transition Year student at St. Leo’s College.)

At the Young Social Innovator of the Year Awards 2005, the Transition Year class of St Leo’s – founded by the Sisters of Mercy in 1839 – won the Global Citizenship Award. Their project, ‘Stop the Trafficking of Women into Ireland for Sexual Exploitation’, was inspired by stories of young girls and women whose experiences were so shocking that they could not be ignored.

Asking the Right Questions: Christians, Muslims, Citizens in Ireland

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007

February 2007

Gerry O’Hanlon SJ

Our neighbour, eight-year old Muhammad, arrived at the front door on Hallowe’en night in the guise of Darth Vader; he was flanked by two other children from the road, disguised as a pirate and the devil. Later, his eleven-year old sister, Selma, arrived on her own, gorgeously dressed as a witch. As they departed with their trick or treat goodies, I recalled the words of President McAleese, addressed to Muslims in Ireland at the tenth anniversary celebrations of the Islamic Cultural Centre in Clonskeagh, Dublin: ‘Your being here helps us and keeps challenging us to find ways to be joyfully curious about each other … we, I hope, will try our best to make Ireland a country of real welcome and a country of celebration of difference …’1 Are the President’s words realistic or are they naïve? I want to explore the kinds of questions we need to put to one another as Irish citizens so that obstacles to the realisation of the President’s hopes can be overcome.

Ireland’s Asylum System – Still a Shambles?

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007

February 2007

Peter O’Mahony

Introduction
Having worked overseas for more than ten years, I returned to live in Ireland in 1997. In the years during which I was away, both the pace and the scale of change in this country were significant; over the subsequent decade, however, they have been even more dramatic.

Nowhere has this been more evident than in the area of migration. Ireland, long seen internationally as a country of huge emigration, with, a mere generation ago, outflows in some years of more than 50,000 people, is now a country of substantial inward migration, both forced and voluntary.

Working Notes Issue 54 Editorial

on Monday, 05 February 2007. Posted in Issue 54 Immigration and Integration: Realities and Challenges, 2007

February 2007

The cover of this issue of Working Notes features a colour photograph of a scene from Moore Street in Dublin just a few weeks ago. This street, like many other parts of Dublin, is now populated by many nationalities – immigrants who have come to live in this country. Ireland has become more colourful as a result of immigration and many people, both migrants and Irish, are enriched personally, socially and culturally as a result. Individuals, communities and organizations have embraced the opportunities presented by immigration and have responded positively to the associated challenges. Many newcomers are making great efforts to adapt to their new home and share their talents and cultural riches. However, international experience shows that the harmonious coming together of peoples in a host country cannot be taken for granted.

When Ireland became an independent State it inherited some appallingly bad housing conditions. This was most notoriously the case in the severely deprived areas of inner-city Dublin, but inadequate and overcrowded housing which lacked basic facilities was also prevalent in towns and villages and rural areas around the country. Read full editorial

Working Notes is a journal published by the Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice. The journal focuses on social, economic and theological analysis of Irish society. It has been produced since 1987.