Articles tagged with: Education

A Very Unlevel Playing Field: A Reflection on Young Adults in Higher Education

on Tuesday, 09 January 2018. Posted in 2017, Issue 81 Young Adults in Ireland Today, Current

PdfIconA Very Unlevel Playing Field: A Reflection on Young Adults in Higher Education

Kevin O'Higgins SJ

Introduction
A lifetime of working with young adults has left me in no doubt that inequalities associated with the circumstances of our birth are more than likely to lead to successive waves of inequality that may accompany us throughout the remainder of our lives. This is true whether we are born into disadvantage or privilege.

Reflections from an Ignatian Educational Perspective

on Thursday, 08 December 2016. Posted in Issue 79 Justice in the Global Economy, Economics

Brian Flannery

PdfIconReflections from an Ignatian Educational Perspective

Introduction
The Report, Justice in the Global Economy, is a call to action. Whilst it combines the clarity and scholarship of an academic paper, its underlying tone conveys urgency. The Report calls on all of us in Jesuit works to wake up to the realities that humankind is facing and asks that as individuals, organisations, and institutions we turn our attention and energy to addressing these global challenges immediately.

This study and the urgency of its message is clearly stimulated by various statements of Pope Francis who is quoted as calling on all Christians to fight against ‘an economy that kills’ and to address ‘the structural causes of inequality’.1 The Pope sees humankind as being at a pivotal point in history where, despite economic advancements, sizeable parts of the world’s population are excluded from economic prosperity, are socially isolated and live in poverty.

Educational Disadvantage

on Thursday, 26 April 2007. Posted in Issue 55 The Election Issue, 2007

May 2007

pdf Education Disadvantage 65.09 Kb


Introduction

If you are a child or young person attending school in a disadvantaged area of Dublin, there is a 30 per cent chance that you will leave primary school with a serious literacy problem;1 only a 50:50 chance that you will sit your Leaving Certificate,2 and a 90 per cent probability that you will not go to college.3 In contrast, if you are a child or young person whose parents are from a professional background and you live in a prosperous part of Dublin, you have only a 10 per cent chance of leaving primary school with a serious literacy problem, you will almost certainly complete your Leaving Certificate and be part of the 86 per cent of young people in your area who go to college.

The Leaving Cert. and Good Outcomes: Hard Work, Good Luck or What?

Written by Cathy Molloy on Sunday, 29 June 2003. Posted in Issue 43 Juvenile Crime: Are Harsher Sentences the Solution?, 2002

Cathy Molloy, a part-time worker at CFJ, considers some issues behind the annual Leaving Cert. hype.

 

Every year at this time the newspapers and media in general invite us to share in the immediate drama of the Leaving Cert. Even if you have no student in your house, or have not been in contact with school books for decades, you cannot be unaware of the annual wave of hysteria that seems to have to accompany the final public examinations of the nation\'s school leavers.